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    Monday
    Jul252011

    BBQ SovBo Style

    I decided to smoke some ribs and pork butt over the weekend.  It was over 100 degrees.  I considered just throwing the meat out on the concrete patio.  It was sure hot enough to burn the bottoms of your feet after 15 seconds!  But, instead, I figured I'd put a little more effort into it than that.

    I got home from work Friday night about 1 am.  The first thing to do was clean up the kitchen so I'd have some room to work.

                                     

    Then it was time to get some beans soaking for the baked beans.

    Pick out any debris such as rocks and bad looking beans.  A little water and presto!  That job is done for tonight.

        

    Now get out the ingredients for some rib rub.

    A little stirring with a spoon and then using my fingers to break up all the brown sugar.  Mix it till it's as smooth as a baby's bottom.  Cover until morning.  Wait.  It's 3am.  THAT is morning.

    Now for the piggy.  7 1/2 lbs of pork butt & 5 1/2 lbs of spare ribs.  Yum.  Yum.

    The pictures are a little blurry, but so were eyes.  There was no time to get a tripod.  It was time for bed. 

    After 4 1/2 hours of sleep I was ready to commence fixin' some vittles.  First things first.  Clean out the smoker before it gets too hot outside.  A little wire brush action and a good spraying with the garden hose and it was ready for some fuel.

    What do I have out here in the garage?  2 bottles of propane...nope.  It's not a propane smoker.

     1/4 bag Kingsford briquets.  Yes.  I'll need that.  A 20 lb bag of lump charcoal.  Yes.  I'll need that.  1/16 bottle lighter fluid.  Is that all I have??  Well, it is hot enough outside that spontaneous combustion is right around the corner.  Take the lighter fluid.  What do I have in the wood box?  Eh, just some dried Maple from the big tree out back.  Wish I had some hickory, tho.  Hickory makes the best BBQ, but any wood is better than no wood.  That should be a good start for some coals.  I am on a budget afterall.

    Let's load 'er up.

    A few briquets under the wood and it lit right up.  Be back to check on it later.  Made sure to put the smoker in view of the backdoor window so I could keep an eye on it from inside.  Now let's get those beans started.  They need to cook until soft.  Throw in some chopped onion (from the garden), a few small chopped cloves of garlic (from the garden), and a nice ripe red jalepeno (from the garden) chopped up, seeds and all.  Get this cooking for an hour before baking them in the smoker.

     

    After rinsing off the meat it's time for a little oil wrestling.  The meat needs to be completely rubbed down with cooking oil.  What's in the cupboard?  Canola oil.  That'll do.

     

    Once that's done, all that's left is getting every nook and crany covered with the rub.  Viola!

    That's a fine lookin' butt right there.

    Those ribs are lookin' good, too.

    No pictures taken applying the rub.  It's really kind of messy and I didn't want my camera looking like the ribs.  Besides, after not much sleep, the whole idea of taking pictures was wearing thin.  Anywho, let's see how the smoker is coming along.

    That looks great.  The coals are ready.  Uuchi, ouchi!  I don't know which is hotter, those coals, or my barefeet.  Run for the back porch!  Yeeoow!

    Let's get some meat in the smoker.  Here's what it looked like after the first hour.

    Stir the beans.  I know.  No pictures of getting the beans ready.  I said the idea of taking pictures was wearing thin.  Just mix in some Brer Rabbit Molasses, salt and pepper, brown sugar, a little rib rub, and whatever else you have in the cupboard.  Or look up a real recipe online.  I tend to be creative when I'm cooking at home.  Every 45 mins to an hour mist the meat with a spray bottle of water (or apple juice, but I was out).  This will keep the meat moist until the fat of the meat bastes itself.

    That's pretty much it.  Add more lump charcoal as needed to keep things cooking at around 225 - 250 degrees.  I will warn you that the thermometer in the top of a barrel smoker like mine needs to read 300 - 350 degrees in order for it to be 225 at the meat level.  I think this is the one thing that has frustrated more beginners than anything else.  When the heat rises along the top of the smoker lid and out of the exhaust that probe needs to read hotter than what your cookbook might say.  They should really explain that to people from the get go, but they don't.

    Also, for any beginners, burn your wood down to coals.  You do NOT want billowing smoke coming out of the exhaust or your meat will taste bitter.  And keep the exhaust fully open while cooking.  Control the heat down at the firebox vent.

    Stuff is done when a fork easily goes in and back out of the meat without trying to hang on.  No picture taking at the end.  Sorry.  That's real personal...just between the piggy and the eater!

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    Reader Comments (3)

    Now that looks great! You are 100% right about the grill temps; you have to test it near meat level because the thermos usually lie. You are not kidding about using smoke, that is heavy duty! Ever try applewood? Nice post.

    July 25, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterGYSC

    Yea, I have 3 apple trees out back. Apple wood is very good, but mild. Hickory is worth the effort if you are having company. Thanks for checking out my site GYSC.

    July 25, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterSovBo

    No problem, great cook and nice site.

    July 25, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterGYSC

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